April

7th Grade Language Arts

Norris

 

  Week of April 24-28, 2017

 

MRS. NORRIS Monday, April 24, 2017

Weekly Learning Target:

MC900439610[1]

(What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

Unit 4.1 (45 days)

4 ½ weeks

Common Core Standards

 

Focus

Reinforce/Support

Recur

 

 

 

Focus

RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

RL.7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

 

Reinforce and/or support

RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate

command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 7 on page 52 [of the full ELA

Common Core State Standards document].)

W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast a fictional

portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a

means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history”).

Recur

W.7.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

RI.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – E – Essay Writing (10 minutes). TW continue reading Tangerine. P. 33-50. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: Bell Work: EAGLE LESSON Week 33 - – E – Essay Writing (refer to power point). SW continue reading Tangerine p. 33-50.

RI.7.1,4, 5

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

 

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – Analyze Character (10 minutes) TW allow classes to finish all reading through p. 50. Review events before you administer Tangerine TEST #2. TW continue reading Tangerine. P. 50-70. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel.

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: SW complete daily bell work – week 33 – A –Analyze Character (refer to power point). SW will finish reading through p. 50. SW listen as teacher reviews events in the novel from p.33-50. SW take Tangerine TEST #2. SW continue reading Tangerine p. 50 – 70. FOR A GRADE.

RL7.2, 3, 4; W.7.3

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Tangerine TEST #2

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 PLC Early Release Day!

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – G –Good Answer/GREAT Answer (10 minutes). TW review briefly events through p. 70. TW continue reading Tangerine. P 70 – 94. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: SW complete daily bell work – week 33 – G - Good Answer/GREAT Answer (refer to PowerPoint). SW listen as teacher reviews through p.70. SW continue reading Tangerine p. 70 – 94.

RL.7.1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

 

 

 

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – Literary Devices (10 minutes). TW allow classes to finish all reading through p. 94. Review events before you administer Tangerine TEST #3. TW introduce SINKHOLE NEWS ASSIGNMENT. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: Bell Work: EAGLE LESSON Week 33 - L- Literary Device (refer to power point). SW continue reading Tangerine through p. 94. SW listen as teacher reviews events in the novel through p. 94. SW take Tangerine TEST #3. SW listen as teacher introduces SINKHOLE NEWS ASSIGNMENT. Begin assignment as time permits.

RI.7.1,4, 5

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Tangerine TEST #3

 

 

 

Friday, April 28, 2017

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – E – Emotional Language/Bell Work Quiz (10 minutes). TW review SINKHOLE NEWS ASSIGNMENT. TW allow students to work on assignment. 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: Bell Work: EAGLE LESSON Week 30 E- Emotional Language (refer to PowerPoint). SW listen as teacher reviews SINKHOLE NEWS ASSIGNMENT. Finish Sinkhole assignment. FOR A GRADE.

RI.7.1, 4, 9; W.7.2

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

SINKHOLE NEWS ASSIGNMENT

 

 

 

  Week of April 3-7, 2017

 

MRS. NORRIS Monday, April 3, 2017

Weekly Learning Target:

(What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

Unit 4.1 (45 days)

4 ½ weeks

Common Core Standards

 

Focus

Reinforce/Support

Recur

 

 

 

Focus

RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

RL.7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

 

Reinforce and/or support

RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate

command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 7 on page 52 [of the full ELA

Common Core State Standards document].)

W.7.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast a fictional

portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a

means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history”).

Recur

W.7.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

RI.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – E –Essay Writing (10 minutes). TW introduce scholars to Elements of an American Gothic Novel. TW pass out worksheets for Annotation and Notes before beginning the novel, Tangerine. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: SW complete daily Eagle Lesson -Week 30 E - Essay Writing. SW watch PP presentation on the Elements of an American Gothic Novel, and take notes of figurative language to prepare for Tangernine. Begin annotation of the novel

RL7.1, 4

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

 

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – Analyze Character (10 minutes) TW finish Annotation of the Prologue for Tangerine. Begin reading Tangerine. P. 4-33. Review for Test #1 Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel.

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: SW complete daily bell work – week 30 – A –Analyze Character (refer to power point). SW begin reading Tangerine p. 4 – 33 and prepare for Test #1.

RL7.2, 3, 4; W.7.3

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 PLC Early Release Day!

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – G –Good Answer/GREAT Answer (10 minutes). TW review briefly for Test #1. TW give Test #1 for Tangerine. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: SW complete daily bell work – week 30 – G - Good Answer/GREAT Answer (refer to PowerPoint). SW listen as teacher reviews p. 4 – 33 and take Tangerine Test #1. FOR A GRADE.

RL.7.1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Tangerine TEST #1

 

 

 

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – Literary Devices (10 minutes). TW continue reading Tangerine. P. 33-50. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: Bell Work: EAGLE LESSON Week 30 - L- Literary Device (refer to power point). SW continue reading Tangerine p. 33-50.

RI.7.1,4, 5

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

 

 

 

Friday, April 7, 2017

Teacher Activities/ Resources (How will the students be learning this?)

Teacher Activities: TW facilitate daily Eagle Lesson – E – Emotional Language/Bell Work Quiz (10 minutes). TW review p. 33 – 50 to prepare students for Test #2. Give Test #2. Last 5 minutes of class: Questions and Comments Wrap-Up Time.

Goal is for scholars to read a novel for pleasure and understanding, identifying key elements of a novel

Student Activities (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? – future learning?)

Student Activities: Bell Work: EAGLE LESSON Week 30 E- Emotional Language (refer to PowerPoint). SW listen as teacher reviews p. 33-50 and then take TEST #2. FOR A GRADE.

RI.7.1, 4, 9; W.7.2

Assessment (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Tangerine TEST #2

 

 

 

7th Grade Language Arts

Norris

Week of April 18 – April 22, 2016

 

Monday 4/18

Objective

(Student will…)

PARCC TESTING

Teacher Activities

 

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

 

Additional Resources

 

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

 

 

Tuesday 4/19

Objective

(Student will…)

PARCC TESTING

Teacher Activities

 

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

 

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

 

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

 

 

Wednesday 4/20 (Early Release at 2:20)

Objective

(Student will…)

PARCC TESTING

Teacher Activities

 

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

 

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

 

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

 

 

Thursday 4/21

Objective

(Student will…)

PARCC TESTING

Teacher Activities

 

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

 

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

 

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

 

 

Friday 4/22

Objective

(Student will…)

PARCC TESTING

Teacher Activities

 

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

 

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

 

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


7th Grade Language Arts

Norris

Week of April 11- April 15, 2016

 

Monday 4/11

Objective

(Student will…)

Identify vocabulary words for a Vocabulary Crossword puzzle and finish all annotation. L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson – Emotional Language. (Refer to Power Point). Allow students to find and highlight ALL remaining vocabulary words for Tangerine and write definitions in the book. Finish ALL Annotation.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Find and highlight ALL remaining vocabulary words for Tangerine and write definitions in the book. NO HOMEWORK UNTIL AFTER TESTING!!

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Who was responsible for the burglaries in the neighborhood?

 

 

Tangerine Vocabulary Crossword tomorrow!

Academic Vocabulary

American Gothic novel, syntax, characterization, diction, tone, flashback, figurative language, simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, alliteration, hyperbole, oxymoron, allusion, pun, conflict, theme, protagonist, antagonist, internal conflict, external conflict, setting, point of view, first person, astride, bogus, pathetic, apparition, peripheral, conviction, nullify, immorality, restitution, unanimous

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

Cooperative learning, modeling, close reading, graphic organizer, guided reading. Questioning the text, annotation, Chunking the text. Think aloud, Check for understanding, assistance with reading, short instructions, positive reinforcement, positive feedback

Additional Resources

Tangerine by Edward Bloor

Green, yellow, blue, orange, pink highlighters

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

Use EAGLE Lessons to review/re-teach reading strategies; use discussion/review to gauge comprehension for each chapter.

 

Tuesday 4/12

Objective

(Student will…)

Identify vocabulary words for a Vocabulary Crossword puzzle. L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson – Annotation. (Refer to Power Point). Give Tangerine Vocabulary Crossword Puzzle Quiz.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Take Tangerine Vocabulary Crossword Puzzle Quiz. NO HOMEWORK UNTIL AFTER TESTING!!

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Tangerine Vocabulary Crossword!

Academic Vocabulary

American Gothic novel, syntax, characterization, diction, tone, flashback, figurative language, simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, alliteration, hyperbole, oxymoron, allusion, pun, conflict, theme, protagonist, antagonist, internal conflict, external conflict, setting, point of view, first person, astride, bogus, pathetic, apparition, peripheral, conviction, nullify, immorality, restitution, unanimous

Additional Resources

Tangerine by Edward Bloor

Green, yellow, blue, orange, pink highlighters

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

Cooperative learning, modeling, close reading, graphic organizer, guided reading. Questioning the text, annotation, Chunking the text. Think aloud, Check for understanding, assistance with reading, short instructions, positive reinforcement, positive feedback

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

Use EAGLE Lessons to review/re-teach reading strategies; use discussion/review to gauge comprehension for each chapter.

 

Wednesday 4/13 (Early Release at 2:20)

Objective

(Student will…)

Transform text from one genre to another. RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson -Grammar. (Refer to Power Point) Individually create a picture that represents the “Two Faces of Erik”. Give textual evidence to support the two sides of his character.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Create a picture that represents the “Two Faces of Erik”. Give textual evidence to support the two sides of his character. NO HOMEWORK UNTIL AFTER TESTING!!

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

“The Two Faces of Erik” picture

Academic Vocabulary

American Gothic novel, syntax, characterization, diction, tone, flashback, figurative language, simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, alliteration, hyperbole, oxymoron, allusion, pun, conflict, theme, protagonist, antagonist, internal conflict, external conflict, setting, point of view, first person, astride, bogus, pathetic, apparition, peripheral, conviction, nullify, immorality, restitution, unanimous

Additional Resources

Tangerine by Edward Bloor

Green, yellow, blue, orange, pink highlighters

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

Cooperative learning, modeling, close reading, graphic organizer, guided reading. Questioning the text, annotation, Chunking the text. Think aloud, Check for understanding, assistance with reading, short instructions, positive reinforcement, positive feedback

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

Use EAGLE Lessons to review/re-teach reading strategies; use discussion/review to gauge comprehension for Chapter 7.

 

Thursday 4/14

Objective

(Student will…)

Transform text from one genre to another. RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson – Literary Devices . (Refer to Power Point) Individually create a picture that represents the “Two Faces of Erik”. Give textual evidence to support the two sides of his character.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Finish the picture that represents the “Two Faces of Erik”. Give textual evidence to support the two sides of his character. NO HOMEWORK UNTIL AFTER TESTING!!

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

“The Two Faces of Erik” picture

Academic Vocabulary

American Gothic novel, syntax, characterization, diction, tone, flashback, figurative language, simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, alliteration, hyperbole, oxymoron, allusion, pun, conflict, theme, protagonist, antagonist, internal conflict, external conflict, setting, point of view, first person, astride, bogus, pathetic, apparition, peripheral, conviction, nullify, immorality, restitution, unanimous

Additional Resources

Tangerine by Edward Bloor

Green, yellow, blue, orange, pink highlighters

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

Cooperative learning, modeling, close reading, graphic organizer, guided reading. Questioning the text, annotation, Chunking the text. Think aloud, Check for understanding, assistance with reading, short instructions, positive reinforcement, positive feedback

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

Use EAGLE Lessons to review/re-teach reading strategies; use discussion/review to gauge comprehension for each chapter.

 

Friday 4/15

Objective

(Student will…)

Identify vocabulary words for a Vocabulary Crossword puzzle. L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson – Essential Vocabulary . (Refer to Power Point). Give “Vocabulary WORDFIND”.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Find vocabulary words in a “Vocabulary WORDFIND”. NO HOMEWORK UNTIL AFTER TESTING!!

Assessment/Evaluation (Have students met the learning target? What does success look like?)

Tangerine Vocabulary Wordfind

 

PARCC TESTING BEGINS NEXT WEEK!!!

Academic Vocabulary

American Gothic novel, syntax, characterization, diction, tone, flashback, figurative language, simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, alliteration, hyperbole, oxymoron, allusion, pun, conflict, theme, protagonist, antagonist, internal conflict, external conflict, setting, point of view, first person, astride, bogus, pathetic, apparition, peripheral, conviction, nullify, immorality, restitution, unanimous

Additional Resources

Tangerine by Edward Bloor

Green, yellow, blue, orange, pink highlighters

Modifications (SPED; ELL)

Cooperative learning, modeling, close reading, graphic organizer, guided reading. Questioning the text, annotation, Chunking the text. Think aloud, Check for understanding, assistance with reading, short instructions, positive reinforcement, positive feedback

REFLECTION/ RE-TEACH

Use EAGLE Lessons to review/re-teach reading strategies; use discussion/review to gauge comprehension for each chapter.

 

 

 

 


7th Grade Language Arts

NORRIS

 

Week of April 27-May 1, 2015

 

Monday 4/27

Objective

(Student will…)

Read a poem to evaluate symbolism and determine theme and point of view. RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central ideas of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

Have students listen to “The Raven” (SB/ p. 275 – 278) and highlight unfamiliar words. Then listen a second time as they watch the video. Work in groups of 3 – 4 to answer questions in the book. You will need to finish tomorrow.

Student Activities

Read and analyze “The Raven”

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 4/28

Objective

(Student will…)

Read a poem to evaluate symbolism and determine theme and point of view. RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central ideas of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

Have students listen to “The Raven” (SB/ p. 275 – 278) and highlight unfamiliar words. Then listen a second time as they watch the video. Work in groups of 3 – 4 to answer questions in the book.

Student Activities

Read and analyze “The Raven”

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 4/29 (Early Release at 2:20)

Objective

(Student will…)

Write a variety of original poems to add to their Poetry Journal.

RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

Teacher Activities

Students will write the “I Am” poems to add to their Poetry Journals. Show the PowerPoint presentation outlining the poem.

Student Activities

Write the “I Am” poem

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday 4/30

Objective

(Student will…)

Write a variety of original poems to add to their Poetry Journal.

RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

Teacher Activities

Students will write the “Bio” poem to add to their Poetry Journals. Show the PowerPoint presentation outlining the poem.

Student Activities

Write the “Bio” Poem to add to Poetry Journal

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday 5/1

Objective

(Student will…)

Write a variety of original poems to add to their Poetry Journal.

RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson #94 Essential Vocabulary. (Refer to Power Point) Students will write 3 “Cinquain”poems to add to their Poetry Journals. Show the PowerPoint presentation outlining the poem.

Student Activities

Write 3 Cinquain poems.

Assessment/Evaluation[JC1][JC2]

What are the parts of a plot?

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

SpringBoard Books

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 [JC1]

 [JC2]


7th Grade Language Arts

NORRIS

 

Week of April 13-17, 2015

 

Monday 4/20

Objective

(Student will…)

NO SCHOOL

Teacher Activities

 

Student Activities

 

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

 

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 4/21

Objective

(Student will…)

Read several texts and determine theme and point of view. RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central ideas of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson # 92 – Annotation. (Refer to Power Point) Review theme and point of view as a class. In the PURPLE literature book read “Zoo” pages 418-419. Do a three minute quick write summary individually. Next read the poems “Hippopotamus” and The Caterpillar” on pages 420-421. Do a one minute quick write summary for each poem. Finally read “The Blind Men and the Elephant” on pages 422-423. Discuss common themes among the texts in small groups. Come back together as a whole group and discuss the possible themes suggested. Write one paragraph about the theme and give two-three pieces of textual evidence to support the theme. May need to finish tomorrow.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Discuss theme and point of view. Read “Zoo” by Edward Koch, “Hippopotamus” and “The Caterpillar” by Ogden Nash, and “The Blind Men and the Elephant” by John Godfrey Saxe. Write a brief summary of each and a paragraph that discusses a common theme among the texts and gives textual evidence to support the theme.

Assessment/Evaluation

What is theme? What is point of view?

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

Purple Prentice Hall Literature book

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 4/22 (Early Release at 2:20)

Objective

(Student will…)

Read a poem to determine theme and point of view. RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central ideas of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RL.7.6 Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson #93 – Good/Great Answers. (Refer to the power point) Finish yesterday’s assignment if needed. Read individually “Fifth Grade Autobiography” and paraphrase both stanzas. Using personal photos, create an original poem that imitates this one.

Student Activities

Do the EAGLE Lesson. Finish yesterday’s lesson if needed. Read the poem “Fifth Grade Autobiography” by Rita Dove. Paraphrase each stanza. Start an original poem imitating this one using a personal photograph.

Assessment/Evaluation

What is the point of view in today’s poem? Who’s hands does the narrator remember?

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

“Fifth Grade Autobiography” by Rita Dove

Personal Photos (Students)

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday 4/23

Objective

(Student will…)

Create an original poem that imitates one read in class. W.7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson #92 – Literary Devices. (Refer to the power point) Discuss the structure of “Fifth Grade Autobiography” and using a personal photo, create an original poem that follows the same structure. Due tomorrow.

Student Activities

Create an original poem that mimics the structure of the poem “Fifth Grade Autobiography” by Rita Dove. Poem is due tomorrow.

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

“Fifth Grade Autobiography” by Rita Dove

Personal Photos (Students)

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday 4/24

Objective

(Student will…)

Read and interpret several narrative poems. RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central ideas of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

Do a Shared Reading of “Casey at the Bat” (SB pages 287-288). Write a one sentence paraphrase for each of the 13 stanzas. Next do a Shared Reading to read “The Raven” (SB pages 275-278). Create an illustration for the poem other than the picture on page 275.

Student Activities

Read the poem “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer and write a one sentence paraphrase for each stanza. Read the poem “The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe and create an illustration for it.

Assessment/Evaluation[JC1][JC2]

Why was the narrator depressed in “The Raven?”

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem, theme, point of view

Additional Resources

SpringBoard Books

Paper and colored pencils

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 [JC1]

 [JC2]


HOMEWORK DUE Tues, April 14!
READ the poem, "Poppies in the Wheat" and the drama, "A Town Meeting" BEFORE you answer the HOMEWORK questions for CCSS #16.

Poppies in the Wheat

by Helen Fiske Jackson (“H. H.”)

 

Along Ancona’s ˡ hills the shimmering heat,

A tropic tide of air, with ebb and flow

Bathes all the fields of wheat until they glow

Like flashing seas of green, which toss and beat

5        Around the vines.  The poppies lithe and fleet

Seem running, fiery torchmen, to and fro

To mark the shore.  The farmer does not know

That they are there.  He walks with heavy feet,

Counting the bread and wine by autumn’s gain,

10      But I,  --  I smile to think that days remain

Perhaps to me in which, though bread be sweet

No more, and red wine warm my blood in vain,

I shall be glad remembering how the fleet,

Lithe poppies ran like torchmen with the wheat.

ˡ Ancona – a town in central Italy

A Town Meeting

 

CAST OF CHARACTERS

MAYOR, mayor of Hartley Township

MR. HARDY, citizen of Hartley Township

MRS. KLOCKNER, citizen of Hartley Township

Scene 1

SETTING:  The people of Hartley Township, assembled for a small-town meeting, sit in rows of benches or folding chairs surrounding a small raised area with a podium.  The mayor, a young man looking rather inexperienced, stands at the podium, gavel poised. 

1)        MAYOR:  (banging gavel) Hello, everyone!  How’s it going – I mean, I now call this meeting of Hartley Township to order.  (He glances at his notes.)  I’m happy to say there’s only one simple question on our agenda.  We’ll hear public opinion and then vote.  The question is, uh – (he looks as his notes again) – oh, yes, shall we add a tax to pay for our sidewalks to be shoveled after the snow?  (He clears his throat.)  The, uh, floor is now open for comments.

(From the very back row on one side of the room, Mr. Hardy, a burly middle-aged man, stands and speaks matter-of-factly.)

MR. HARDY:  I don’t know why we’re even discussing this.  A little snow on the sidewalk is nothing to worry about; anyone could walk through that.  And if there’s a blizzard, I can shovel my own sidewalks, thank you very much.  (He puts his hands on his hips, stands tall, and looks impressively around the room.Why should I pay an extra tax for something I could do myself?

(There are some murmurs of agreement from the people on the benches, but on the other side of the room, Mrs. Klockner stands up.  She is a crotchety elderly lady with a cane that she brandishes at people for emphasis, though she speaks in a quavery voice.)

MRS. KLOCKNER:  (waving her cane toward Mr. HardyBill, you’ve never thought of anyone but yourself, even when I was your teacher in kindergarten and you were the only one not to share your snack!  (Mr. Hardy, embarrassed, shrinks a little, and Mrs. Klockner addresses the group.Plenty of us are in a pickle when the sidewalks are filled with snow.  I can hardly get around even when there’s no snow, and now you’re asking me to skip through the snowdrifts?  The least you could do is make sure an old lady doesn’t break her ankle on the sidewalk!

(There are more murmurs of agreement, and the townspeople begin arguing among themselves.  As the volume swells, the mayor, who has been looking increasingly distressed at this unexpected disagreement, raises the gavel again.)

MAYOR:  (banging the gavel) Calm down, everyone!  Let’s be rational.  (He is ignored, and changes tactics.)  Cookies, everyone!  Let’s take a break and you’ll find refreshments in the back!  (aside) And I’m going to go outside for some fresh air. 

Scene 2

SETTINGThe mayor stands alone outside the town hall, pacing in great frustration.

5)        MAYOR:  “Run for mayor,” they said.  “It’s an easy job,” they said.  “In this town, everyone gets along.”  Well, they didn’t mention this!  Who knew such nice people could get to upset?  I’ve only lived here a few months; how could I possibly resolve a dispute between a grown man and his former kindergarten teacher?  They’ve known each other maybe longer than I’ve even been alive!  How did I walk into such a circus?  (He stops pacing, and stands still with resolve.)  But they elected me mayor, and mayor I’m going to be; someone’s got to impose order here.  If they won’t pay the tax for someone to shovel snow, well, they’ll just have to help each other out for free!  I’ll make a new town ordinance.  By law, Mr. Hardy will have to shovel Mrs. Klockner’s sidewalks, whether he want to or not!  I may never get elected again – (he shudders) – but it’s the only fair way.

(As the mayor turns to go back inside, Mr. Hardy and Mrs. Klockner come out of the town hall door, arm in arm.)

MR. HARDY:  (to the mayor) You’re running a beautiful meeting in there – the most civil one we’ve had in years!

(The mayor looks at them in astonishment.)

MRS. KLOCKNER:  (patting the mayor’s arm) Oh, don’t worry, dear, we’ve settled the snow question.  Bill, here, has agreed to shovel my sidewalks for free!  And we’ve worked it out so anyone else who needs help shoveling just has to ask.  (She laughs as the mayor shakes his head in bewilderment.)  Oh, a little shouting never hurt anyone.  That’s how it’s done in a small town, dear; you’ll get used to it soon enough.  Now come back inside and have some cookies.

(They walk through the door back into the town hall.)


7th Grade Language Arts

NORRIS

 

Week of April 13-17, 2015

 

Monday 4/13

Objective

(Student will…)

Read and ENJOY poetry. Write examples of poems for Poetry Journal. RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson # 89 – Essential Vocabulary. (Refer to Power Point) Take the practice End of Year practice exam.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Take the practice End of Year practice exam.

Assessment/Evaluation

 

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

Tablets or paper copies of the EOY practice test.

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 4/14

Objective

(Student will…)

Read and ENJOY poetry. Write examples of poems for Poetry Journal. RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson # 90 – Annotation. (Refer to Power Point) Finish the EOY practice test. Discuss the best answers for the questions.

Student Activities

Do EAGLE Lesson. Finish the EOY practice test.

Assessment/Evaluation

What did you find difficult on this test?

Academic Vocabulary

 

Additional Resources

Tablets or paper copies of the EOY practice test.

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 4/15 (Early Release at 2:20)

Objective

(Student will…)

Examine poems to determine how structure effects a poem’s meaning as well as write a concrete poem. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson #91 – Good/Great Answers. (Refer to the power point) Discuss how structure influences meaning in a poem. Read “Sarah Sylvia Cynthia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out” (Purple Lit Book pages 405-406) orally. Have students read it again silently and put a sticky note at the end of each sentence. Discuss what they notice about the length of the sentences and the garbage builds. Discuss why the author did that. Was it on purpose? How does it add to the meaning of the poem? Next look at the concrete poem “Seal” (Purple Lit Book page 754). Read it orally. Have everyone read it silently. Ask students to discuss how the shape of the poem adds to the meaning. Have students write a concrete poem of their own where the words will be placed in a shape relevant to the meaning of the poem. This will be homework, due to tomorrow if not completed in class.

Student Activities

Do the EAGLE Lesson. Read the poems “Sarah Sylvia Cynthia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out” and “Seals” to look at and discuss structure. Write an original concrete poem. (The words of the poem should for a shape relevant to the poem.) HOMEWORK: Finish the concrete poem-due tomorrow!!

Assessment/Evaluation

How can the structure of a poem contribute or enhance the meaning of the poem?

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem

Additional Resources

Purple Prentice Hall Literature Books

Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday 4/16

Objective

(Student will…)

Examine poems to determine how structure effects a poem’s meaning as well as write a concrete poem. RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.RL.7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Teacher Activities

EAGLE Lesson #92 – Literary Devices. (Refer to the power point) Discuss the structure of a narrative poem and how it lines up with narrative prose. Read “The Highwayman” (SB pages295-298 or Purple Lit Book pages 300-305). Paraphrase for understanding during a second reading.

Student Activities

Do the EAGLE Lesson. Continue working on original poem and illustration. Due tomorrow.

Assessment/Evaluation

How is the meaning and your understanding of the poem different than it would be while reading a historical text?

Academic Vocabulary

Poetry, rhyme, rhythm, concrete poem, narrative poem

Additional Resources

 

Reflection